Encyclopedia of Fantasy (1997)
Pollock, Walter Herries

(1850-1926) UK author, who wrote a great deal in collaboration. With his mother, Lady Julia Pollock (?   -1899), and W K Clifford he compiled The Little People and Other Tales (coll 1874). With Walter Besant he wrote the novella "Sir Jocelyn's Cap" (1884-1885) – which anticipated the method and tone of F Anstey's fantasies – and The Charm and Other Drawing-Room Plays (coll 1896), whose title piece is a marginal fantasy.

WHP collaborated with Andrew Lang on He (1887), a parody of H Rider Haggard's She (1887) set in darkest London. It was published as "by the authors of It, King Solomon's Wives and Bess". (It was actually the US writer John De Morgan [1848-circa 1920] – who also published an anonymous volume called He (1887) – who wrote It [1887] and Bess [1887]; these were pastiches rather than parodies. One Henry Chartres Biron was the author of King Solomon's Wives [1887] by "Hyder Ragged". De Morgan's more earnest homage was King Solomon's Treasures [1887].)

WHP also wrote several stories with the US writer J Brander Matthews (1852-1929), including the comic fantasy "Edged Tools" (1886). He wrote The Were-Wolf: A Romantic Play in One Act (1898 chap) with Lilian Moubrey. His solo short novel, about a family Curse and a Femme Fatale, "Lilith" (1874-1875), was reprinted as the first item in The Picture's Secret: A Story, to Which is Added An Episode in the Life of Mr Latimer (coll 1883), but appeared under its original title in A Nine Men's Morrice: Stories Collected and Recollected (coll 1889). The second item in the former collection, which in the latter was re-separated into its two constituent parts – "Mr Morton's Butler" and "Lady Volant" – is WHP's best comic fantasy: a tale in which attempts to trick a young man into a Pact with the Devil go awry in spite of his awesome naivety. King Zub (coll 1897) reprints "Sir Jocelyn's Cap" and a few other fantasies: "The Phantasmatograph" (1899) remains unreprinted. [BS]

Walter Herries Pollock

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This entry is taken from the Encyclopedia of Fantasy (1997) edited by John Clute and John Grant. It is provided as a reference and resource for users of the SF Encyclopedia, but apart from possible small corrections has not been updated.