Encyclopedia of Fantasy (1997)
Heavy Metal

Glossy full-colour fantasy and sf Comic-strip magazine inspired by the French magazine of similar format, Métal Hurlant ["Screaming Metal"], and containing translations of material from this and other similar French, Spanish and Italian magazines alongside US material by Richard Corben, Bernie Wrightson and others; HM makes a special feature of the work of the French artist Moebius. HM was published monthly April 1977-December 1985, quarterly January (Winter) 1986-Winter 1989, then bimonthly March 1989-current. In the monthly issues material was in serialized form, with stories of sometimes 50+ pages being uncomfortably segmented in long and short episodes. The change to quarterly publication signalled a change of policy; since then HM has featured only complete stories and full-length Graphic Novels.

HM has maintained a consistently high standard of production and content, and has claimed a readership in excess of two million. It has been responsible for introducing to English-language readers many of the top comics creators from the Latin countries, and has thereby been a significant force in the internationalization of the medium. Examples of HM material of fantasy interest are noted in the entries on Alberto Breccia, Richard Corben, Guido Crepax, Moebius, Alex Niño and Bernie Wrightson; others include Ulysses (1978) by Georges Pichard, Conquering Armies (1978) by Gal, Cody Starbuck (1981) and Gideon Faust, Warlock at Large (1982) by Howard Chaykin (1981 and 1982), Urm the Mad (1978), Lone Sloane (1980) and Salammbo (1984) by Phillip Druillet, Zora (1982; graph 1984) by Fernando Fernandez, Polonius (1977) by Jaques Tardi, Druuna (1986, 1988, 1994; graph coll 1993-1995 4 vols) by Eleuteri Serpieri, The Waters of Deadmoon (1990, 1991) by Adamov and Cothias, Dieter Lumpen (1989) by Pellejero and Zentner, The Towers of Bois Maury (1990) by Herman, Slaine by Mills and Simon Bisley. [RT]

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This entry is taken from the Encyclopedia of Fantasy (1997) edited by John Clute and John Grant. It is provided as a reference and resource for users of the SF Encyclopedia, but apart from possible small corrections has not been updated.