Encyclopedia of Fantasy (1997)
Coville, Bruce

(1950-    ) US writer of sf and fantasy, almost exclusively for children. Many of his early works were commercial ties and Shared-World ventures; most are unmemorable, although including the very popular Children's Fantasy My Teacher is an Alien * (1989), which has enjoyed several sequels: My Teacher Fried My Brains * (1990), My Teacher Glows in the Dark * (1991), the first three books being assembled as My Teacher is an Alien: 3 Books in One * (omni 1995), and My Teacher Flunked the Planet * (1992). In recent years he has been engaged in revising and republishing many of his earlier books; this has produced a rather complex bibliography.

BC's best work has probably been his 1990s YA fantasies. These include his Magic Shop books – Jeremy Thatcher, Dragon Hatcher (1991) and Jennifer Murdley's Toad (1992) – and Goblins in the Castle (1992) and Oddly Enough (coll 1994). The Unicorn Chronicles sequence to date comprises only Into the Land of Unicorns (1994). [GF]

other works: The Dragonslayers (1994 chap); Fortune's Journey (1995), historical; the Rod Allbright series, comprising Aliens Ate My Homework (1993), I Left My Sneakers in Dimension X (1994) and The Search for Snout (1995); the A.I. Gang trilogy, comprising Operation Sherlock (1986; rev 1995), Robot Trouble (1986; rev 1995) and Forever Begins Tomorrow (1986; rev 1995); the Nina Tanleven series, comprising The Ghost in the Third Row (1987), The Ghost Wore Grey (1988) and The Ghost in the Big Brass Bed (1991). BC has written book and lyrics for four stage musicals, three being fantasies for children: The Dragonslayers (produced 1981; professional premiere 1996), Out of the Blue (produced 1982) and It's Midnight! (Do You Know Where Your Toys Are?) (produced 1983).

as editor: Bruce Coville's Book of Monsters: Tales to Give you the Creeps (anth 1993), Bruce Coville's Book of Aliens: Tales to Warp Your Mind (anth 1994) and Bruce Coville's Book of Nightmares: Stories to Make You Scream (anth 1995).

Bruce Coville

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This entry is taken from the Encyclopedia of Fantasy (1997) edited by John Clute and John Grant. It is provided as a reference and resource for users of the SF Encyclopedia, but apart from possible small corrections has not been updated.